Rookie Awards 2024 - Open for Entries!
MODERN VANITAS
Share

MODERN VANITAS

Christian Abi-Aoun
by ChristianArcs on 2 Apr 2024

The main purpose of this work is to revisit and modernize the concept of vanitas paintings, all while honing my technical skills, of course. The principle of this type of painting is to remind the viewer of their mortality and the worthlessness of worldly goods and pleasures.

1 169 0
Round of applause for our sponsors

A R T W O R K S

First still renders. Composited with Photoshop. These initial visuals allowed me to have a clearer idea of the artistic direction for the rest of the project.

To make it more cinematic, I animated the cameras, lights, and volumetrics of the scene. I also added a Venom like fluid simulation on top of the skull. This was my approach to bring more vitality into the artwork.

B R E A K D O W N S

R E S E A R C H   A N D   D E V E L O P M E N T

I also had the opportunity to do some RND for this project. The purpose of this part of my work was to provide visuals for a cultural event in Bordeaux that combined music and visual arts.

As I was short on time to execute a traditional 3D render, I decided to use Marmoset to meet the deadlines.

I enhanced the Marmoset render in After Effects and was able to offer a looped video for the event, which can be viewed below.

The details of the event. 

P R O C E S S

Sculpting of the model in ZBrush. 

Texturing of the model in Substance Painter. 

Simulation of the fluid with Blender Ivy Generator.

Basic Houdini setup to add some noise and details on the simulation. 

Lighting and rendering in Maya with Redshift.

R E F E R E N C E S

In terms of artistic references, I got inspired by the work of Ryan Metcalf  called "Rise of the Necromancer". 

The original artwork can be found here : https://www.artstation.com/artwork/80lYw

In terms of formal references, I mainly found skull images from Paris catacombs. 

Obviously, I drew significant inspiration from vanitas paintings spanning various historical periods.

"Death and the Soldier"  by Hans Larwin (1917)

"Saint Jerome Writing" by Caravaggio (1605-1606)

T H A N K S   F O R   R E A D I N G


Comments (0)

This project doesn't have any comments yet.